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dc.contributor.authorKinge, Jonas Mineten_US
dc.contributor.authorRoxrud, Ingriden_US
dc.contributor.authorVollset, Stein Emilen_US
dc.contributor.authorSkirbekk, Vegarden_US
dc.contributor.authorRøttingen, John-Arneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-07T11:56:12Z
dc.date.available2015-01-07T11:56:12Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-27eng
dc.identifier.citation. 2014 Nov 27;12(1):64en_US
dc.identifier.issn1478-4505
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/9082
dc.description.abstractBackground: The relationship between research funding across therapeutic areas and the burden of disease in Norway has not been investigated. Further, few studies have looked at the association between national research investments and the global disease burden. The aim of the present study was to analyze the correlation between a significant part of Norwegian investment in health research and the burden of disease across therapeutic areas, using both Norwegian and global burden of disease estimates. Methods: We used research investment records for 2012 from the Research Council of Norway, and the investment records distributed through liaison committees between regional health authorities and universities. Both were classified by the Health Research Classification System (HRCS). Furthermore, we used the years of life lost and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Norway and globally from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 project. We created a matrix to match the expenditures by HRCS with the values from the Global Burden of Disease project. Results: Disease-specific research funding increased with the Norwegian burden of disease measured as years of life lost (correlation coefficient = 0.73). Similar findings were done when the Norwegian disease burden was measured as DALYs (correlation coefficient = 0.62). The correlation between research funding and the global disease burden was low both when years of life lost (correlation coefficient = 0.11) and DALYs (correlation coefficient = 0.12) were used. Generally, when the disease burden was relatively high in Norway compared with the rest of the world, research investments were also high. Conclusions: Across therapeutic areas, the Norwegian research investments appeared aligned with the Norwegian disease burden. The correlation between the Norwegian research investments and the global disease burden was much lower.en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherBioMed Centraleng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0eng
dc.subjectDisability adjusted life yearseng
dc.subjectGlobal healtheng
dc.subjectHealth researcheng
dc.subjectNorwayeng
dc.subjectResearch fundingeng
dc.subjectYears of life losteng
dc.titleAre the Norwegian health research investments in line with the disease burden?en_US
dc.typePeer reviewed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2014-12-02T20:03:55Z
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2014 Kinge et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd
dc.rights.holderJonas Minet Kinge et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/1478-4505-12-64
dc.identifier.cristin1202846
dc.source.articlenumber64
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.journalHealth Research Policy and Systems
dc.source.volume12


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