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dc.contributor.authorAamland, Aaseeng
dc.contributor.authorMalterud, Kirstieng
dc.contributor.authorWerner, Erik L.eng
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-20T09:01:56Z
dc.date.available2014-06-20T09:01:56Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-29eng
dc.identifier.issn1471-2296eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/8005
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: Further research on effective interventions for patients with peristent Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS) in general practice is needed. Prevalence estimates of such patients are conflicting, and other descriptive knowledge is needed for development and evaluation of effective future interventions. In this study, we aimed to estimate the consultation prevalence of patients with persistent MUPS in general practice, including patients’ characteristics and symptom pattern, employment status and use of social benefits, and the general practitioners’ (GPs) management strategy.</p><p>Method: During a four-week period the participating Norwegian GPs (n = 84) registered all consultations with patients who met a strict definition of MUPS (>3 months duration and function loss), using a questionnaire with simple tick-off questions. Analyses were performed with descriptive statistics for all variables and split analysis on gender and age.</p><p>Results: The GPs registered 526 patients among their total of 17 688 consultations, giving a consultation prevalence of persistent MUPS of 3%. The mean age of patients was 46 years, and 399 (76%) were women. The most frequent group of symptoms was musculoskeletal problems, followed by asthenia/fatigue. There was no significant gender difference in symptom pattern. Almost half of the patients were currently working (45%), significantly more men. The major GP management strategy was supportive counseling.</p><p>Conclusion: A consultation prevalence rate of 3% implies that patients with persistent MUPS are common in general practice. Our study disclosed heterogeneity among the patients such as differences in employment status, which emphasizes the importance of personalized focus rather than unsubstantiated stereotyping of “MUPS patients” as a group.</p>en_US
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherBioMed Centraleng
dc.relation.ispartof<a href="http://hdl.handle.net/1956/9249" target="blank">Medisinsk uforklarte plager og symptomer (MUPS) og sykefravær. Allmennlegens rolle</a>eng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0eng
dc.subjectPrevalenceeng
dc.subjectCross-sectional studieseng
dc.subjectSomatoform disorderseng
dc.subjectEmploymenteng
dc.subjectPrimary healthcareeng
dc.titlePatients with persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms: a descriptive study from Norwegian general practiceeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.date.updated2014-06-03T03:10:09Z
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2014 Aamland et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rights.holderAase Aamland et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.eng
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bora.journalTitleBMC Family Practiceeng
bibo.volume15eng
bibo.number107eng
bibo.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-15-107eng
bora.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesseng
dc.identifier.cristinID1136447eng
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2296-15-107
bora.bpoaIDbpoa145
dcterms.isPartOfhttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/9249


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution CC BY