Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHaugland, Sireneng
dc.contributor.authorThune, Turideng
dc.contributor.authorFosse, Beataeng
dc.contributor.authorWentzel-Larsen, Toreeng
dc.contributor.authorHjelmevoll, Stigeng
dc.contributor.authorMyrmel, Helgeeng
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-04T10:10:11Z
dc.date.available2011-01-04T10:10:11Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-25eng
dc.identifier.citationBMC Women's Health 10(9)en
dc.identifier.issn1472-6874eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/4365
dc.description.abstractBackground There has been an increasing number of diagnosed cases of Chlamydia trachomatis in many countries, in particular among young people. The present study was based on a growing request to examine urine as a supplementary or primary specimen in screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in women, with the Becton Dickinson ProbeTec (BDPT) Strand Displacement Assay (SDA). Urine samples may be particularly important in screening young people who are asymptomatic. Methods A total of 603 women aged 15 and older were enrolled from the Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) clinic at Haukeland University Hospital, Norway, in 2007. Only 31 women were older than 35 years. Cervical swabs and urine samples were tested with BDPT for all participants. In cases of discrepant test results from a given patient, both samples were retested by Cobas TaqManCT and a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-method (in-house). Prevalence of C. trachomatis, sensitivity, and specificity were estimated by latent class analysis using all test results available. Bootstrap BC confidence intervals (10 000 computations) were estimated for sensitivity and specificity, and their differences in cervix vs. urine tests. Results A total of 1809 specimens were collected from 603 patients. 80 women (13.4%) were positive for C. trachomatis. Among these, BDPT identified 72 and 73 as positive in cervix and urine samples, respectively. Of the 523 C. trachomatis negative women, BDPT identified 519 as negative based on cervical swabs, and 514 based on urine samples. Sensitivity for cervical swabs and urine samples with the BDPT were 89.0% (95% CI 78.8, 98.6) and 90.2% (95% CI 78.1, 95.5), respectively. The corresponding values for specificity were 99.2% (95% CI 98.3, 100) and 98.3% (95% CI 96.4, 100). Conclusions This study indicates that urine specimens are adequate for screening high-risk groups for C. trachomatis by the SDA method (BDPT). Such an approach may facilitate early detection and treatment of the target groups for screening, and be cost-effective for patients and the health services.en
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherBioMed Centraleng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0eng
dc.subjectChlamydiaeng
dc.titleComparing urine samples and cervical swabs for Chlamydia testing in a female population by means of Strand Displacement Assay (SDA)eng
dc.typePeer reviewedeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Helsefag: 800::Epidemiologi medisinsk og odontologisk statistikk: 803nob
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2010 Haugland et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rights.holderHaugland et aleng
dc.type.versionPublished versioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bibo.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6874-10-9eng
dc.identifier.cristinID538304eng
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6874-10-9


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution CC BY
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution CC BY