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dc.contributor.authorVerpe, Hege
dc.contributor.authorKjellevold, Marian
dc.contributor.authorMoe, Vibeke
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Lars
dc.contributor.authorVannebo, Unni Tranaas
dc.contributor.authorStormark, Kjell Morten
dc.contributor.authorSøvik, Margaret Ljosnes
dc.contributor.authorSkotheim, Siv
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-22T11:59:52Z
dc.date.available2019-05-22T11:59:52Z
dc.date.issued2019-03
dc.identifier.citationVerpe H, Kjellevold MK, Moe V, Smith L, Vannebo UT, Stormark KM, Søvik M, Skotheim S. Early postpartum discharge: maternal depression, breastfeeding habits and different follow-up strategies. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences. 2019;33(1):85-92eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/19693
dc.description.abstract<p>Background: In most maternity wards in Norway, early discharge (&lt;48h) is the norm. To monitor newborns&rsquo; and women&rsquo;s health during the first week after delivery, most maternity wards offer early check-ups, were families return to the hospital (standard care). However, a few municipalities offer home-visits by midwives (domiciliary care), to ensure seamless services for the family.</p> <p>Aim: The primary aim of this study was to explore if different follow-up strategies were differently associated with maternal depression and breastfeeding habits, six weeks and six months postpartum. The secondary aim was to investigate if families at risk for postpartum depression were included in the home visiting program in the municipality that offered both follow-up strategies.</p> <p>Method: This study draws on data from the &ldquo;Little in Norway&rdquo; (LIN) study, which followed families from pregnancy until the child was 18 months. The present study used data from two different municipalities, where one offered standard care (n=95) and the other domiciliary (n=64) and standard care (n=17). The Edinburg postnatal depression scale (EPDS) was used to measure maternal depression. Breastfeeding habits were measured using a self-reported questionnaire. The Life Stress subscale of the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) was used to identify women at risk for postpartum depression.</p> <p>Results: There were no differences in maternal depressive symptoms or breastfeeding habits at neither six weeks nor six months postpartum between women that received standard or domiciliary care in the two municipalities. Within the municipality that offered both follow-up strategies a higher number of women scoring high on prenatal Life Stress were included in domiciliary- compared to standard care.</p> <p>Conclusion: Differential follow-up strategies in the first week after birth did not impact on maternal depression or breastfeeding habits. However, domiciliary care seems to be regarded as supportive and non-stigmatizing for women at risk for postpartum depression.</p>eng
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherWileyeng
dc.subjectpostpartum depressioneng
dc.subjectbreastfeedingeng
dc.subjectadverse life eventseng
dc.subjectdomiciliary careeng
dc.subjecthome visitseng
dc.subjectearly dischargeeng
dc.subjectlife stresseng
dc.titleEarly postpartum discharge: maternal depression, breastfeeding habits and different follow-up strategieseng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.date.updated2019-02-18T14:33:56Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2018 Nordic College of Caring Scienceeng
dc.type.versionacceptedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
dc.type.documentJournal article
dc.identifier.cristinID1618473
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/scs.12604eng
dc.source.issn0283-9318eng
dc.source.issn1471-6712eng
dc.relation.projectIDNorges forskningsråd: 196156
dc.relation.journalScandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences


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