Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorXu, Jianeng
dc.contributor.authorVik, Alexandraeng
dc.contributor.authorGroote, Inge Rasmuseng
dc.contributor.authorLagopoulos, Jimeng
dc.contributor.authorHolen, Areeng
dc.contributor.authorEllingsen, Øyvindeng
dc.contributor.authorHåberg, Astaeng
dc.contributor.authorDavanger, Svendeng
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-06T09:15:37Z
dc.date.available2015-08-06T09:15:37Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-26
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1956/10227
dc.description.abstractNondirective meditation techniques are practiced with a relaxed focus of attention that permits spontaneously occurring thoughts, images, sensations, memories, and emotions to emerge and pass freely, without any expectation that mind wandering should abate. These techniques are thought to facilitate mental processing of emotional experiences, thereby contributing to wellness and stress management. The present study assessed brain activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 14 experienced practitioners of Acem meditation in two experimental conditions. In the first, nondirective meditation was compared to rest. Significantly increased activity was detected in areas associated with attention, mind wandering, retrieval of episodic memories, and emotional processing. In the second condition, participants carried out concentrative practicing of the same meditation technique, actively trying to avoid mind wandering. The contrast nondirective meditation > concentrative practicing was characterized by higher activity in the right medial temporal lobe (parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala). In conclusion, the present results support the notion that nondirective meditation, which permits mind wandering, involves more extensive activation of brain areas associated with episodic memories and emotional processing, than during concentrative practicing or regular rest.eng
dc.language.isoengeng
dc.publisherFrontierseng
dc.rightsAttribution CC BYeng
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/eng
dc.subjectfMRIeng
dc.subjectmeditationeng
dc.subjectattentioneng
dc.subjectnondirectiveeng
dc.subjectbraineng
dc.subjectdefault mode networkeng
dc.subjectmind wanderingeng
dc.titleNondirective meditation activates brain areas associated with retrieval of memories and emotional processingeng
dc.typeJournal articleeng
dc.date.updated2015-08-06T09:08:03Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2014 The Authorseng
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioneng
bora.peerreviewedPeer reviewedeng
bora.journalTitleFrontiers in Human Neuroscienceeng
bibo.volume8eng
bibo.number86eng
dc.identifier.cristinID1195095eng
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2014.00086


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution CC BY
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution CC BY